We are intrinsically attached to objects and places that are valued through nostalgia and nationality. Yet the remembrance of things past is not necessarily the remembrance of things as they were. The collective memory sets up paradoxical obstructions, tempting us to overcome them by repairing a longing with a particular belonging. The nation develops from these common needs of the people, who consisted of different social groups seeking a “collective identity.” My work subversively challenges the misconception of Kuwait’s recent past by symbolically destroying and vandalizing national artifacts and heritage sites. My investigations aim to understand popular memory and the enthusiastic resurrections of our society.